Monday, April 15, 2019

Crock Pot Pork Tenderloin with Cranberry Sauce


I love pork loin and I found this recipe at Ashley Fehr's blog thereciperebel.com. It sounds mighty tasty and very easy! 

According to Ashley, "This Crock Pot Pork Tenderloin with Cranberry Sauce is an easy slow cooker meal or a fancy holiday dinner -- you decide! The BEST pork tenderloin recipe."  I'll take her word for it. I think I'll try it this week. Thank you, Ashley! 

Crock Pot Pork Tenderloin with Cranberry Sauce
Ingredients
  • 1 pork tenderloin (1-1.5lbs, trimmed -- see post above)
  • 1 1/2 cups whole berry cranberry sauce(1 348ml can)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar (35g)
  • 1/3 cup low sodium chicken broth (75g)
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (30g)
  • 1 tablespoon corn starch (10g)
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper

Instructions

  • Place pork tenderloin in 2-4 quart crock pot, cutting in half lengthwise to fit flat if necessary.
  • In a large bowl or glass measuring cup, whisk together cranberry sauce, sugar, broth, vinegar, corn starch, garlic, salt and pepper. Pour over tenderloin in crock pot, lifting the pork to let the sauce seep underneath.
  • Cover and cook on high for 2 hours or low for 4 hours, or until it reaches an internal temperature of 150-165 degrees. Remove pork and place on a cutting board to rest for 3-5 minutes. 
  • If desired, add an additional tablespoon of corn starch mixed with a tablespoon of water to thicken remaining juices. 
  • Slice and serve with sauce.

Are you a fan of pork loin? Thanks for visiting and have a great week!

Monday, April 8, 2019

Writing Tips From 24

I just discovered that the television program 24 is available on Amazon Prime. I loved that show and just might be tempted to do a little binge watching since it's been off the air for a while and I can't remember all the story lines.

During its original eight seasons, I picked up quite a few tips on compelling story telling.

The cliffhanger hooks were always exciting, leaving unanswered questions, the foreshadowing of an attack, or a love dilemma.  If you've ever had trouble formulating a hook to close a chapter, 24 just might inspire you!

As writers, in any story we look for goal, motivation and conflict.  In 24, the main GMC was as follows:

Goal: To keep the country safe from terrorism

Motivation: The safety of the American people 

Conflict: The terrorists want to terrorize, the federal agents want to stop them

But look for the GMC in the characters, as well:  
  • Who has to work with whom, and why is this a problem? 
  • Who has something to prove and why?  
  • Who has lost something significant and how does this affect his/her job performance?  
  • What is the conflict within the terrorist organization that will keep it from performing effectively?  
  • What conflict keeps the government in pursuit of the wrong lead? 
  • How detrimental will a past love be to a high ranking government official?
You can't have a good story without conflict, and 24 delivers! Were you a fan of 24? Also, do you have a favorite television show that's inspired your writing technique?

Thanks for visiting and have a great week!     

Monday, April 1, 2019

Hidden History: The Other Internment Camps

I just read Lisa See's wonderful novel China Dolls, and part of the story takes place in a Japanese internment camp. It brought to mind this story that I posted back in 2013.

I think everyone is familiar with the disgraceful legacy of internment camps for Americans of Japanese descent during World War II.  However, if you're like me, you probably didn't know that internment camps existed for German and Italian Americans, as well.  

Family of Ludwig Eberhardt. Eberhardt was interred at Camp Kenedy in Texas

The World War II experience of thousands of German Americans, to most,  is an unknown.  During World War II, the U.S. government and many Americans viewed German Americans and others of "enemy ancestry" as potentially dangerous, particularly immigrants.  The government used many interrelated, constitutionally questionable methods to control persons of German ancestry, including internment, individual and group exclusion from military zones, internee exchanges, deportation, repatriation, "alien enemy" registration, travel restrictions and property confiscation.
 The human cost of these civil liberties violations was high.  Families were disrupted, if not destroyed, reputations ruined, homes and belongings lost.  By the end of the war, 11,000 persons of German ancestry, including many American-born children, were interned. 
 Pressured by the United States, Latin American governments collectively arrested at least 4,050 German Latin Americans.  Most were shipped in dark boat holds to the United States and interned.  At least 2,000 Germans, German Americans and Latin American internees were later exchanged for Americans and Latin Americans held by the Third Reich in Germany.
Apparently, this is one of those historical facts shrouded in secrecy.  To learn more, as well as read personal stories,  visit The Freedom of Information Times.

Is this a part of history you're familiar with?  If so, how did you learn about it?

Thanks for visiting and have a great week!

Originally posted 5/27/13